Links Roundup, 3rd April 2014

Some of the interesting articles and web sites that I have come across this week:

Fridge Raider: Dean Karnazes

edge.si.com 28 March 2014

“Dean Karnazes’ fridge didn’t always look like a hijacked Whole Foods warehouse. In fact, if you’d looked inside the ultrarunner’s icebox five years ago, you would have discovered a very different inventory than the wild-caught fish, organic fruits and vegetables, and natural energy bars that crowd his shelves now. “I used to eat horribly,” says Karnazes, ticking off a menu that includes pizza, Cheetos, Doritos, and other self-described “crap” he once used to fuel his 145-pound frame through races ranging from 50 miles to 350.”

Jogging Can Be Harmful, Scientists Claim

The Independent, 03 April 2014

“People who sweat and slave in extreme workouts in the hope that they will live longer may be unwittingly harming themselves, according to US researchers.”

“If you want to run a marathon, run one and cross it off your bucket list.” (Dr James O’Keefe, director of preventive cardiology at the Mid-American Heart Institute in Kansas City)

Canadian Race Guide

For anyone considering an event in Canada:

New Salomon Product

Salomon have been busy, sharing posts on the Sense Mantra 2, the Sense Pro, the X-Tour, the X-Wind Pro, the S-Lab Sense 3 Ultra and the X-Scream over on their SalomonUK Google+ channel:

Barefoot Running: The Pros And Cons

www.athleticsweekly.com

“Over the last few years barefoot and minimalist shoe running has become very popular. In the distant past, top GB runners such as Bruce Tulloh, Ron Hill and Zola Budd discarded their shoes and the legendary Abebe Bikila went barefoot in the 1960 Olympic marathon and won! Nowadays many African runners tend to do their running miles to and from school unshod.”

City Vs. Suburb: Walking One Mile In Streets Or Culs-de-Sac

weburbanist.com, 29 March 2014

“A tale of two neighborhoods”, an interesting look at how much further you can get on foot when you take a walk (run) through an urban grid versus the suburban sprawl.